Disaster Recovery with #AWS

IT infrastructure is the hardware, network, services and software required for enterprise IT. It is the foundation that enables organizations to deliver IT services to their users. Disaster recovery (DR) is preparing for and recovering from natural and people-related disasters that impact IT infrastructure for critical business functions. Natural disasters include earthquakes, fires, etc. People-related disasters include human error, terrorism, etc. Business continuitydiffers from DR as it involves keeping all aspects of the organization functioning, not just IT infrastructure.

When planning for DR, companies must establish a recovery time objective (RTO) and recovery point objective (RPO) for each critical IT service. RTO is the acceptable amount of time in which an IT service must be restored. RPO is the acceptable amount of data loss measured in time. Companies establish both RTOs and RPOs to mitigate financial and other types of loss to the business. Companies then design and implement DR plans to effectively and efficiently recover the IT infrastructure necessary to run critical business functions.

For companies with corporate datacenters, the traditional approach to DR involves duplicating IT infrastructure at a secondary location to ensure available capacity in a disaster. The key downside is IT infrastructure must be bought, installed and maintained in advance to address anticipated capacity requirements. This often causes IT infrastructure in the secondary location to be over-procured and under-utilized. In contrast, Amazon Web Services () provides companies with access to enterprise-grade IT infrastructure that can be scaled up or down for DR as needed.

The four most common DR architectures on AWS are:

  1. Backup and Restore ($) – Companies can use their current backup software to replicate data into AWS. Companies use S3 for short-term archiving and Glacier for long-term archiving. In the event of a disaster, data can be made available on AWS infrastructure or restored from the cloud back onto an on-premise server.
  1. Pilot Light ($$) – While backup and restore are focused on data, pilot light includes applications. Companies only provision core infrastructure needed for critical applications. When disaster strikes, Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) and other automation services are used to quickly provision the remaining environment for production.
  1. Warm Standby ($$$) – Taking the Pilot Light model one step further, warm standby creates an active/passive cluster. The minimum amount of capacity is provisioned in AWS. When needed, the environment rapidly scales up to meet full production demands. Companies receive (near) 100% uptime and (near) no downtime.
  1. Hot Standby ($$$$) – Hot standby is an active/active cluster with both cloud and on-premise components to it. Using weighted DNS load-balancing, IT determines how much application traffic to process in-house and on AWS. If a disaster or spike in load occurs, more or all of it can be routed to AWS with auto-scaling.

In a non-disaster environment, warm standby DR is not scaled for full production, but is fully functional. To help adsorb/justify cost, companies can use the DR site for non-production work, such as quality assurance, testing, etc. For hot standby DR, cost is determined by how much production traffic is handled by AWS in normal operation. In the recovery phase, companies only pay for what they use in addition and for the duration the DR site is at full scale. In hot standby, companies can further reduce the costs of their “always on” AWS servers with Reserved Instances (RIs).

Smart companies know disaster is not a matter of if, but when. According to a study done by the University of Oregon, every dollar spent on hazard mitigation, including DR, saves companies four dollars in recovery and response costs. In addition to cost savings, smart companies also view DR as critical to their survival. For example, 51% of companies that experienced a major data loss closed within two years (Source: Gartner) and 44% of companies that experienced a major fire never re-opened (Source: EBM). Again, disaster is not a ready of if, but when. Be ready.

All contents copyright © 2014, Josh Lowry. All rights reserved.

Disaster Recovery with AWS
by Josh Lowry

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